2021 Guest Artists

New to the Trail!

Doerner winter.jpg
Doerner working.jpg

Tracie Doerner at Chris May's studio

tracie2207@gmail.com

I attended art school at the University of Arizona in Tucson; my concentration was in Graphic Design and Illustration. I currently work in Clinical Research, but my passion will always be my art.

I paint mostly in watercolor and acrylic. My style is quite controlled, yet I strive to incorporate a looser touch which reflects a sense of limitless freedom. I reference images that I capture while spending time in the mountains. My paintings represent my love of nature and my gratitude for the simple things that make life profound.

New to the Trail!

Secrest long dangling earrings.JPG
Secrest smaller dangling earrings.JPG

Jill Secrest at Robin McCondichie's studio

jillfsecrest@gmail.com

I am a packaging engineer by day, a polymer clay dabbler by night. Growing up with two artist parents, I've always wanted to find an art medium that I naturally connect with in the way my parents' connect with their medium of choice. So far, polymer clay has provided this to me. I started creating polymer clay earrings because I needed a hands-on creative release and as a bonus, I enjoy wearing playful earrings so I was building my jewelry collection! I enjoy experimenting with different techniques and am always learning and refining designs.

Griffin 1.jpg
Griffen 2.jpg

Mike Griffin at Lauren Hirsh's studio

avidgolf@gmail.com

Mike Griffin’s passion for ceramics began when he was exposed to the great potters and artistic environment of Alfred University.  As a golf professional he found He had lots of time in the winter and taught himself how to throw pots by watching YouTube videos.  Through lots of trial and error and a few studio spaces he has been playing with clay for ten years.

 

Around Naples Mike is known best as the golf pro at Reservior Creek but his true passion is creating unique functional pieces in clay during the off season.  He finds balance in this duality but looks forward to retiring to be a full time potter!   His work is sold at a few galleries around the state. 

 

Eli Applebaum blue vase.jpg
Eli Applebaum glasses.jpg

Eli Applebaum at Leon Applebaum's studio

 

My home in the Finger Lakes has been my source of inspiration for making blown glass: son of a glass maker; sailor of the lakes; skier of the snowy Bristol hills.  

The process of working with glass is all about flowing, with attention to details of the moment, working through the transformation of the elements of fluid glass to make and shape a beautiful and often functional object.

I raise my glass to this path.

 

New to the Trail!

Miller Merangel.jpg

Margaret Miller at David Chandler's studio

margaretmiller922@gmail.com

 

I am fortunate to have lived my life by the ocean; its influence shows up everywhere in my artwork. I began collecting beach treasures at an early age, and continued to be an avid beachcomber. I was drawn to the frosty sea glass and well-worn sculpted shells.

I have always aspired to be an artist; majoring in Art in college and then later had the opportunity to work for a designer goldsmith. I began creating my own jewelry designs which eventually became my business, Low Tide Jewels. The name was inspired by sea glass which is found at low tide. My 16-year-ld son asked me one day why I was taking precious metal and wrapping it around trash ; I replied with a smile, “ Just wait and see .”

I use only genuine sea glass, and if not found by me, I make sure it is found on a beach somewhere. I do not alter my sea glass and that includes never drilling. I wrap the glass in a variety of metals and also use gemstone beads and pearls as accents. Recently I have branched out into non-jewelry artwork in the form of hanging sculptures and wall art, still incorporating my sea glass, shells, driftwood, and old barnwood.

Stash rollins pond_foggy morning.jpg

Mark Stash at Scott Grove's studio

markstash18@gmail.com

“I'm inspired when spending time in nature. Watching the sun come up while in the fall woods is almost a spiritual experience. Kayaking on a beautiful stream in the Adirondacks provokes a certain feeling of calm and well-being. Touring the western states and being awed by the grandeur of the mountains and open spaces is an awesome event. I try to communicate all of these feelings through my artwork.”

Joyce Martelli. Fantasy Trees.jpg
Joyce Martelli  Untitled.jpg

Joyce Martelli Lauren Hirsh's studio

joycemartelliartist@gmail.com

Joyce Martelli is a fiber artist and lives in Rochester. Her mother was a quilter and a ceramist, so Joyce has been exposed to creativity since her birth. This constant exposure to color, patterns and painting led her into her passion. Her first path into the arts was through Music Education with a degree from the University of New Hampshire. In the 1990’s, she took her first traditional quilt class and quickly moved to designing abstract wall hangings using her own hand-dyed and painted fabrics. Although she does not have a “formal” degree in art, she has studied with many fiber artist over the years. She is now using her creations in wall hangings as well as book arts.

 

Her expression in art comes from deep inside where colors and designs go wild, and her music training supports her sense of flow and rhythm in each piece. Inspiration comes from her emotions at the time of creation or by just releasing her inner child. She loves creating and hopes that each piece may motivate or awaken the creative spirit in others.